news-2


Bishop thanks First minister for meeting

Friday 7 October 2011  
 
Speaking after his meeting with the First Minister, Bishop Philip Tartaglia said; I am grateful to the First Minister, for the opportunity to have raised these matters with him in a personal way. I share the concerns of the Scottish Government that sectarianism should be eradicated from Scottish society. Fears that the wide remit of the ˜Offensive Behaviour Bill might impinge on the freedom to hold and express otherwise inoffensive views appear to have been recognised and are being addressed.
 
Archbishop Tartaglia added; I particularly welcome the First minister s commitment to track and analyse sectarian crime on an on-going basis using all data relating to Section 74 of the Criminal Justice Scotland Act 2003. Clearly, we cannot tackle a problem without first measuring it.
 
Archbishop Tartaglia concluded; Our discussions also afforded me an opportunity to reiterate the Catholic Bishops publicly stated commitment to strenuously oppose any moves towards ˜same sex marriage . This matter remains unresolved for the moment since the consultation is on-going. I thank the First minister for his assurance that the Government has not reached a final decision on this issue.
 
ENDS
 
Peter Kearney
Director
Catholic Media Office
5 St. Vincent Place
Glasgow
G1 2DH
0141 221 1168
07968 122291
pk@scmo.org
www.scmo.org <https://www.scmo.org>  
 
Notes to Editors:
 
1.During the week beginning Sunday 16 October, the Catholic Parliamentary Office will distribute 100,000 postcards to Scotland s 500 Catholic parishes urging Catholics to complete a declaration in defence of marriage. Responses will be submitted to the Scottish Government s consultation.
 
2. Archbishop Tartaglia, the Bishop of Paisley has this week issued a Pastoral Letter to all parishes in his Diocese it will be read at all masses on 8 & 9 October, it is titled In Defence of Marriage a copy of the letter will be given to all parishioners. In his letter, the Bishop says;  
 
Same Sex Marriage is wrong in principle because marriage is uniquely the union of a man and a woman, which, by its very nature, is designed for the mutual good of the spouses and to give the children who may be born of that union a father and a mother.     A same sex union cannot do that. A same sex union should not therefore be called marriage.  
 

Same Sex Marriage is unnecessary because the State recognises same sex unions in the form of civil partnerships. In civil partnerships, therefore, same sex partners have all the rights and privileges of marriage, except the right to be called a marriage. There is no good reason to change that.

 

The introduction of Same Sex Marriage into law will have undesirable consequences for the common good with regard to the public understanding of marriage and of parenting, with regard to the religious and moral education of children and young people, and with regard to freedom of speech, freedom of religion and freedom of conscience.

 

The full text of the letter is shown below.

 

Pastoral Letter “ October 2011  

My dear brothers and sisters in Christ,
The Scottish Government has launched a consultation in which they propose that same sex marriage should be introduced in Scotland.
The Catholic Bishops of Scotland have expressed their unanimous opposition to this proposal. I have made public my own submission to the Scottish Government. You can read it on the website of the Diocese of Paisley at www.rcdop.org.uk <http://www.rcdop.org.uk>  
I have also given radio and television interviews in which I have defended the institution of marriage as uniquely the union of a man and a woman, and stressed the foolishness of the Government s proposal to re-define marriage to accommodate same sex unions.  
I now ask you to respond individually to the Government Consultation and say that you are against the introduction of same sex marriage.
 
Same Sex Marriage is wrong in principle
Nature, reason and religion concur that marriage is uniquely the union of a man and a woman, which, by its very nature, is designed for the mutual good of the spouses and to give the children who may be born of that union a father and a mother.  
For obvious reasons, a same sex union cannot do that. A same sex union should not therefore be called marriage. Same sex unions are different in nature and purpose from marriage. Same sex marriage is therefore not an issue about equality or human rights. It is an issue about the nature and meaning of marriage in our society.  
It is very important to realise that opposition to the introduction of same sex marriage is not, as some so stridently assert, ˜homophobic bigotry , but is the assertion and defence of the nature and meaning of marriage which has been universally recognised by all cultures and all the great   religions, and which has sustained humanity since time immemorial.   It is therefore wrong and foolish to undermine this understanding of marriage.  
 
Same Sex Marriage is unnecessary
The State recognises same sex unions in the form of civil partnerships. In law, same sex partners have all the rights and privileges of marriage, except the right to be called a marriage. Same sex marriage is therefore unnecessary. Moreover, to call a civil partnership a marriage is to play a childish but dangerous game with language, in which people make something mean whatever they want it to mean.
 
Same Sex Marriage will have undesirable consequences
1.     Same sex marriage will change the nature of parenting. The normal mother and father model of parenting will   be replaced in law and then gradually in culture by a non gender-specific model of parenting which will deprive children of their right to have a mother and a father, and which will have negative implications for the sexual identity of children, creating in the long run a society in which more and more people will not be able to identify their sexuality, something which will further damage marriage and family, and be to the detriment of the common good.

 

2.     The introduction of same sex marriage into law will have detrimental effects on education. The new models of sex education, of marriage and of parenting will certainly become mandatory in public schools. While Catholic schools in Scotland have autonomy in religious education programmes, the ideological and bureaucratic pressure on teachers and schools to conform to the new coercive orthodoxy could become unbearable, creating a climate of confusion, mistrust and fear in education and in schools, as teachers and educators are cajoled and bullied into teaching what is contrary to faith, reason and common sense.

 

3.     Once the definition of marriage is changed to accommodate same sex unions on account of equality and human rights, Government will have no good reasons not to extend the definition of marriage to other combinations, such as three or more partner marriages. The problem will be that Government will not be able to give a principled answer to requests for polygamous marriage. It will not be able to say, This is not allowed because it is not right . It can only say, This is not allowed because it s not allowed , and this is clearly unsatisfactory and ultimately unsustainable.

 

4.     The redefinition of marriage to include same sex unions will bring with it State-sponsored discrimination and penalties in the courts and in the workplace against anyone who dares to question the rightness of same sex marriage, thereby riding roughshod over freedom of speech, freedom of religion and freedom of conscience.

Civil Partnerships and Same Sex Marriages in Church
The Government s assurance that it will not require religious bodies to register civil partnerships or conduct same sex marriages is disingenuous. The Government could not require the Catholic Church under any circumstances to conduct civil partnerships or same sex marriages. In a democracy, any such attempt would be a serious infringement of religious liberty. So as far as the Catholic Church is concerned, this assurance is worth nothing. It is a complete red herring.
 
However, what the Government s assurance may do is to create the expectation that religious bodies will register civil partnerships and conduct same sex marriages, thereby heaping pressure on religious bodies which are uncertain which way to go and sowing the seeds of dissent and disunity among Church memberships. It would have been much wiser for the Government not to have attempted to interfere in the legitimate freedom and self-regulation of religious bodies.  
 
Conclusion
The Government Consultation remains open until 9th December 2011. Please contribute to the consultation and tell the Government that you do not want same sex marriage to be introduced in Scotland because it is wrong in principle, it is unnecessary in practice and will have damaging consequences for the common good.  
Yours devotedly in Christ,
 
X Philip Tartaglia, Bishop of Paisley
 
Notes
You can respond to the Government consultation in two ways:
1.     By filling out the postcard from the Catholic Parliamentary Office, which will be delivered soon to your parish.

 

2.     By accessing the on-line response form on same sex marriage at the Scottish Government website:  

 

http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2011/09/05153328/0  

 

You can email your completed response to familylaw@scotland.gsi.gov.uk <mailto:familylaw@scotland.gsi.gov.uk>   or you can print it off and send it by post to Sandra Jack, Scottish Government, St. Andrew s House, Regent Road, Edinburgh EH1 3DG.

Subscribe to Updates

Subscribe to:
Like   Back to Top   Seen 160 times   Liked 0 times

Subscribe to Updates

If you enjoyed this, why not subscribe to free email updates ?

Subscribe to News updates

Enter your email address to be notified of new posts:

Subscribe to:

Alternatively, you can subscribe via RSS RSS

‹ Return to News

We never share or sell your email address to anyone.

I've already subscribed / don't show me this again

Recent Posts

Media Arrangements for Archbishop Tartaglia's Funeral

| 8 hours ago | Blogging

Media Arrangements for Archbishop Tartaglia's Funeral   The Archbishop’s Funeral Rites will be celebrated in St Andrew's Cathedral, Glasgow, subject to the restrictions that are in place. Under current regulations only 20 of the Archbishop’s closest family and friends will attend and no media presence in the Cathedral will be possible.  However media outlets are free to make use of the following arrangements:   Vigil ceremony and Reception of Remains of Archbishop Tartaglia on Wednesday 20th January at 6.30 pm accessible by using this video link: https://youtu.be/idlkb2sNUcc     The Archbishop's Funeral Mass will take place on Thursday 21st January at 12 noon, and will be accessible by using this video link: https://youtu.be/tS6rtYC0DhMS   Still photos of the ceremonies will be available shortly after each liturgy at the following address and can be freely downloaded and used by the media. https://www.flickr.com/photos/archdioceseofglasgow/  The main celebrant of the Requiem Mass for Archbishop Tartaglia will be Bishop Hugh Gilbert of Aberdeen, President of the Bishops' Conference of Scotland. His sermon will be made available to the media and can be used after 12 noon on Thursday January 21.   Please note that external photography is not an option as the Cathedral ceremonies will be held behind closed doors. The coffin of the Archbishop will not be carried from the Cathedral as it will be buried in the Cathedral Crypt immediately after the Requiem Mass.   ENDS   For further information, contact   Ronnie Convery, Director of Communications RCAG - 07735 224789   ...

Statement from Bishop Stephen Robson on the death of Bishop Vincent Logan

| 6 days ago | Blogging

14 January 2021    Following the death of Bishop Emeritus Vincent Logan, the current Bishop of Dunkeld, Bishop Stephen Robson, has issued the following statement:    My Dear People   It is with deep regret that I must share with you the sad news that Bishop Vincent, Emeritus Bishop of this Diocese, has died.  Bishop Vincent was 79.    Vincent Logan was Bishop of the diocese of Dunkeld for almost 32 years before his retirement on June 30th, 2012.  He was appointed to Dunkeld by Saint John Paul II and consecrated Bishop by Cardinal Gordon Joseph Gray on 26th February 1981.  Sadly his retirement years, from 2012 to the present were affected by a good deal of ill health which affected his mobility. He died earlier this morning, 14th January 2021, the day after his good friend Archbishop Philip Tartaglia of Glasgow alongside whom he served on the Bishops Conference of Scotland. Both bishops succumbed to the lethal effects of the Coronavirus.    Bishop Vincent is survived by one remaining brother, James, and by two nephews Vincent and James, to whom our condolences are offered.  His faithful PA, Press Officer and friend of 40 years, Elaine Harrison, has cared for him in an exemplary manner especially over the years of his retirement.  Though devastated by his death, Elaine is happy that Bishop Vincent is now at peace with the Good Lord.   Bishop Vincent Logan was born in Bathgate, West Lothian, on 30th June 1941. After education in St Mary’s Academy, Bathgate, St Mary’s College, Blairs and St Andrew’s College, Drygrange,  Vincent was ordained priest by Cardinal Gray in Edinburgh on 14th March 1964. Following on from a number of diocesan appointments as assistant priest in Edinburgh, and further studies in catechetics in Corpus Christi College London, Vincent was appointed, Diocesan Advisor in RE, Director of the RE Office in the Archdiocese of Saint Andrews and Edinburgh, and finally Vicar Episcopal for Education in the Archdiocese from 1977-1981. His final parochial appointment in the Archdiocese was as Parish Priest of St Mary’s, Ratho, from 1977-1981. Following on from his consecration as Bishop of Dunkeld on 26th February 1981, he served for 32 very energetic and innovative years both in the Diocese and in the Bishops Conference. His work was greatly appreciated at all times.    Much can be said about Bishop Vincent’s achievements, but these can wait for a more leisurely time once the pandemic dangers have passed and we can Celebrate Bishop Vincent’s Requiem Mass more appropriately. The funeral arrangements are as yet unknown, but the Mass and burial will be recorded and streamed, so that all who have access to the internet will be able to participate.   With every blessing to you all and a request for prayers for Bishop Vincent.   + Stephen Robson Bishop of Dunkeld   ENDS    Peter Kearney Director Catholic Media Office 0141 221 116807968 122291 pk@scmo.org www.scmo.org                     Note to Editors:   An image of Bishop Logan is available here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/139632090@N07/50833807603/in/album-72157717885467253/  ...

Scotland’s Bishops mourn the death of Bishop Emeritus Vincent Logan 

| 6 days ago | Blogging

14 January 2021    Scotland’s Bishops mourn the death of Bishop Emeritus Vincent Logan    Following the death today (14 January 2021) of Bishop Emeritus Vincent Logan, the President of the Bishops’ Conference of Scotland, Bishop Hugh Gilbert has issued the following statement:    “It is with a heavy heart that we mourn the loss of Vincent Logan, the retired bishop of Dunkeld. The bishops of Scotland offer our deep condolences and the promise of our prayers to Bishop Stephen Robson and all the clergy and people of the Diocese of Dunkeld as they remember Bishop Vincent.    Coming only a day after the death in Glasgow of Archbishop Philip Tartaglia marks this week as one of loss and mourning for the Catholic church in Scotland.    Bishop Vincent Logan was dedicated and energetic. His episcopal ordination in 1981 at the age of 39 made him one of the youngest bishops in the world and gave him an energy and zeal in all he did. His commitment to Catholic Education was well known and his robust defence of it will be long remembered.    On behalf of the Bishops of Scotland, we commend his soul into the hands of God and pray that he may enjoy eternal rest.”    ENDS    Peter Kearney Director Catholic Media Office 0141 221 116807968 122291 pk@scmo.org www.scmo.org                      Note to Editors:   An image of Bishop Logan is available here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/139632090@N07/50833807603/in/album-72157717885467253/   Biography: Rt. Rev. Vincent Logan: Born Bathgate 30 June 1941, Educated, St. Mary’s Academy, Bathgate, St. Mary’s College Blairs, Aberdeen, St. Andrew’s College, Drygrange. Ordained priest Edinburgh 14 March 1964. Diploma in religious Education, Corpus Christi College London 1966-67. Ordained Bishop of Dunkeld, by Cardinal Gordon gray 26 February 1981. Resugned 30 June 2012. Died 14 Jan 2021 aged 79.   Change email address / Leave mailing list Powered by YMLP...

Scotland’s Catholic Bishops mourn the death of Archbishop Philip Tartaglia

| 7 days ago | Blogging

13 January 2021   Scotland’s Catholic Bishops mourn the death of Archbishop Philip Tartaglia   Following the death of Archbishop Philip Tartaglia, the President of the Bishops’ Conference of Scotland, Bishop Hugh Gilbert has issued the following statement:   “It is with the deepest sadness that we have learned today on the Feast of St. Kentigern (Mungo) of the death of our brother bishop and friend Philip Tartaglia. His loss to his family, his clergy and the people of the Archdiocese of Glasgow will be immeasurable but for the entire Church in Scotland this is a day of immense loss and sadness.   He was a gentle, caring and warm-hearted pastor who combined compassion with a piercing intellect. His contribution to the work of the Bishops’ Conference of Scotland over the past sixteen years was significant and we will miss his wisdom, wit and robust Catholic spirit very much.   On behalf of the Bishops of Scotland, we commend his soul into the hands of God and pray that he may enjoy eternal rest.”   ENDS   Peter Kearney Director Catholic Media Office 0141 221 116807968 122291 pk@scmo.org www.scmo.org                     Note to Editors:   An image of Archbishop Tartaglia is available here:   https://www.flickr.com/photos/139632090@N07/25510264473/in/album-72157666531058155/   Biography:   Philip Tartaglia was born at Glasgow on 11th January 1951. He is the eldest son of Guido and Annita Tartaglia and had three brothers and five sisters. After his primary schooling at St. Thomas’, Riddrie, he began his secondary education at St. Mungo’s Academy, Glasgow, before moving to the national junior seminary at St. Vincent’s College, Langbank and, later, St. Mary’s College, Blairs, Aberdeen. His ecclesiastical studies were completed at the Pontifical Scots College, and the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome.  He was ordained Priest by then-Archbishop Thomas Winning in the Church of Our Lady of Good Counsel, Dennistoun on 30th June 1975. He then returned to Rome to study for his Doctorate in Sacred Theology.   On completing his Doctorate in 1980, he was appointed assistant priest at Our Lady of Lourdes, Cardonald, while at the same time becoming visiting lecturer at St. Peter’s College, Newlands, Glasgow.  A year later, he was appointed Lecturer at St. Peter’s College, Newlands, becoming Director of Studies in 1983. When Chesters College, Bearsden, opened in 1985 he was made Vice-Rector. In 1987 he was appointed Rector.  He served as Rector until 1993 when he was appointed to St. Patrick’s, Dumbarton, as Assistant Priest before being appointed Parish Priest of St. Mary’s, Duntocher in 1995. In 2004, the Bishops’ Conference appointed him Rector of the Pontifical Scots College, Rome.  On 13th September 2005, Pope Benedict XVI nominated him Bishop of Paisley. On 20 November 2005, he was ordained Bishop in St Mirin's Cathedral by Archbishop Mario Conti who he was to succeed as Archbishop of Glasgow  On 24th July 2012, Bishop Tartaglia was appointed Archbishop of Glasgow and was installed at St Andrew's Cathedral, Glasgow, on Saturday 8th September 2012, the Feast of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary.  He died on January 13 2021, the Feast of St Mungo, the Patron Saint of Glasgow.       ...